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BREE

artist statement

     My artistic practice is very diverse. Often I enjoy making art for the sake of creation, whether the work is pretty, interesting, intricate, weird, or unsettling, and at other times I want the viewer to think more deeply. I paint, draw, and sculpt, use assemblage, watercolor, oil, acrylic, makeup, cosmetics, culinary, sewing, embroidery, building, woodwork, carving, anything I can physically get my hands on really. I find it fulfilling to create, and am fascinated by the power of making an idea a reality. Further, I like the problem solving that occurs with creative endeavors. 

     Conceptually my work arises from, but is not limited to, the ideas pertaining to the concepts of gender, sexuality, identity, police brutality, gore, viscera, plague, pastels, weird animals, illness (plague, mental, long term - more specifically, diabetes and mental health (anxiety and depression primarily). For example, if the work is based around LGBT+, gender, sexuality, and or identity. I want people to question themselves, to even let themselves consider those possibilities, to understand how their life may be different from a trans lesbian’s life, that people are so vastly different, causing experiences to be very different.  Ultimately, I want people to see what is going on and how it affects me and others and how current events are detrimental to all of us, even if it may only affect certain groups more prominently. People need to see that just because something does not affect them, that they still have a responsibility to advocate for change.

     My methods vary from medium to medium, and vary based on the project. With painting, I enjoy building texture, height, and depth with the physicality of the  paint, whether oil or acrylic. When using watercolor I enjoy making nonrepresentational washes of color, they remind me of space clouds or photos of nebulas and galaxies. The subjects of my drawings vary and are based on the medium. My drawings usually start with an outline or a graphite base sketch with. Then I either build on top of the graphite using ink or charcoal. If I use ink, a pen, I will erase the pencil and remove it from the drawing. With charcoal the graphite becomes lost and is no longer a prominent or noticeable piece of the work. For ink drawing, I typically will fill those in with markers, copics, for the colors or watercolors instead. 

Trash Painting
Angry Baby
Angry Baby
Both Sides
Monotone Still Life
Change Is Inevitable
Study
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Trash Painting
Angry Baby
Angry Baby
Both Sides
Monotone Still Life
Change Is Inevitable
Study
Study
Study

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